Garfield Comic Strip Original Artwork

The images shown on the Garfield Comic Strip Original Artwork product pages are only representations of what the original artwork may look like. Each piece may vary in appearance. Comic strips produced in the 1980s may look different from the comic strips created in the late 1990s into the 2000s.

Most of the comic strips were created using Windsor & Newton Series 7 Sable #1 brushes and Pelikan black drawing ink on Strathmore 500 Series 3-Ply Bristol board with a Plate surface finish. This board has been a favorite of artists for over a century.  It is made of 100% cotton fibers and is acid-free.

Over the years, the board, along with any adhesive-backed Zip-A-Tone patterns or photostats, may have yellowed.

The blue-lines, guidelines used by the artists for inking, may be more noticeable in the older comic strips. Also visible on some comic strips are areas where the artists may have used a white liquid to correct or revise any inked lines

Eventually, Jim Davis had standardized boards printed with a non-photo blue line to be used for inking each panel's outline, baselines for lettering and labels for dating each comic strip. 

Here are four examples of original comic strips that show these differences:


This daily comic strip was published in the newspaper on October 13th, 1980. The gray background (in some areas it has yellowed significantly) was created using a product called Zip-A-Tone.


This daily comic strip was published in the newspaper on October 21st, 1996 and was created on the printed boards with non-photo blue panel guidelines, lettering baselines and the label at the top for the date.


This Sunday comic strip was published in the newspaper on November 13th, 1988 and is a wonderful example of a Sunday featuring a lot of detail! The blue-line for the background can be seen in Jon's speech balloon in the third panel. Printer's marks and labels are still attached.


This Sunday comic strip was published in the newspaper on August 17th, 2008 and was created on the printed boards with non-photo blue panel guidelines, lettering baselines and template labels at the top and bottom.